Employment Issues Among Rural Family Physicians in Canada

Comparing Graduates of Canadian Medical Schools and International Medical Graduates

Canadian Medical Association, May, 2014.

“Similarities between GCMS and IMGs who have been licensed in Canada for at least 8 years were seen with respect to location, percentage who were FPs, plans to relocate and professional satisfaction. Significant differences occurred between Canadian graduates and those more recently licensed IMGs. Here there is a clear difference in work hours, location, future plans and satisfaction. As a group, they seem less settled and content in terms of their practice setting and career fulfillment.”

Comparing Graduates of Canadian Medical Schools and International Medical Graduates – Results of 2013 National Physician Survey. (C3PR, May, 2014, PDF)

Impact of Interprofessional Practice on Access to Resources and Patient Waiting Times

Poster presented at the Taming of the Queue Conference in Ottawa, ON, March 2014.

“Physicians in an IP practice reported greater satisfaction with access to most health care professionals and clinical resources than those in a solo or group practice. Better access could mean shorter waiting times for patients. The Patient’s Medical Home model promotes interprofessional teams delivering patient-centred care for all Canadians.”

2014 Taming of the Queue – Impact of Interprofessional Practice on Physician Access to Resources and Patient Waiting Times (2014, March, PDF)

Rural and Urban Practices – Where they differ and where they don’t

Canadian Medical Association, March, 2014.

“We continue to see heavier workloads among rural physicians with them typically being on-call over 3 days per month more than their more urban colleagues. It is equally interesting to note, however, the similarities in accessing services and providers where it is often assumed the challenges will be greater in the more bucolic areas of Canada. They have embraced electronic health records to the same extent and over half of both groups say it has increased the productivity of their practice.”

Rural and Urban Practices – Where they differ and where they don’t. (C3PR, March, 2014, PDF)

National Physician Survey Cohort – a multi-year analysis

Canadian Medical Association, January, 2014.

” The cohort file also allows us to temper, to some extent, our interpretation of the intentions reported in the main National Physician Survey research file. Intention to retire, adopt an electronic record or change a practice in other ways does not always pan out in the time period originally planned.”

National Physician Survey Cohort – a multi-year analysis. (C3PR, January, 2014, PDF)

Compensation among Physicians in Canada

Canadian Medical Association, December, 2013.

“The era of most physicians being paid solely by the fee-for-service method is over as illustrated by the results of the 2013 National Physician Survey where 38% reported receiving 90% or more of their professional earnings from fee-for-service compared to two thirds of all physicians in 19962. Being paid by more than one method (blended) is now equally prevalent at 41%.”

Compensation among Physicians in Canada. (C3PR, December, 2013, PDF)

 

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